Author: Carl

Wanna Cyber, fname lname?

“Whether you’re partaking in deals this year or passing them by, take a moment to embrace the season’s true gift: all the emails you’ve been meaning to unsubscribe from, all in one place, all at the same time… stacked atop one another like desperate Jenga blocks.”

Spam, Spam, Spam cartoon | Marketoonist | Tom Fishburne

I’ve taken this early Christmas present and removed myself (for now) from so many needy marketers begging for my attention. And then my money.

Many of them I can understand how and why. But there’s another class I can’t figure out why I would have asked for this. And the truth is, I didn’t. It’s spam.

The sneakiest form of spam uses marketing automation tools to wrap badly targeted messaging in a shallow wrapper of personalization.

One of the many benefits of using “peroty” as my identity online means that anything addressed to “Mr. Peroty” or “Hey there, Peroty” means the messages aren’t from people or placed I need to concern myself with.

Right into the trash/spam you go.

Mary Ruefle’s Wrist-moving action

I write by hand because that is how I began, and I love it. Moving the wrist, the marks the pencil or pen leave on the paper—like the trail of a snail—well, it is like drawing, no, it is drawing, and I am so enamoured of this activity that sometimes I write continuously without actually forming real words, I call it ‘fake handwriting,’ and it’s just as much fun as actually ‘writing’. By fun I mean it’s just as much a mystery. The whole wrist-moving action is why I write in the first place. I don’t like tennis, or knitting, I like writing with my hands.

Mary Ruefle

Mary Ruefle does not own a computer. She weird by hand because she likes how it feels.

I love reading this because I feel the same way. I take notes by hand and collect notebooks and pens not because I am working on great novels or essays. But because I like pens and paper and how they feel in and under my hand.

How our System Revenges Rest

Our days have accumulated tasks and responsibilities that behave like invasive plants: if you neglect their maintenance, even for a day, they threaten to pull the entire enterprise asunder. The less societal privilege you have, the more true this feels. People with good credit, power and seniority within their organizations, and an emergency fund can afford to (momentarily) fall behind. Their apologies for a delayed email, a late bill, a late kid will be accepted. For everyone else, drop one ball and risk catastrophe: lost hours, lost jobs, lost credit, lost cars, lost homes.

How Our System Revenges Rest – by Anne Helen Petersen

Anne Helen Petersen is one of my favorite writers and her newsletter is a must-read for me. Even if it does take me some weeks to get to it.

It hits to how I feel work has always been through my entire adult life. Keep going. Keep running. Always work. Always push. Keep the plates spinning.

One misstep will lead to disaster. And I’m one of the privileged ones.